My thoughts on TROPICO.

TROPICO is a 27-minutes short film, featuring 3 songs from the Paradise EP, titled “Body Electric”, “Gods and Monsters” and “Bel Air”. It is directed by Anthony Mandler – who also directed the music video for “Ride” and written by Lana Del Rey herself.

The film tells the tale of Adam and Eve, where Lana plays Eve in the film. There are 3 parts in the film – Eve in the Garden of Eden (first part) was banished down to Earth, in Los Angeles – to become a pole dancer (second part) and then the final part, she returned to Paradise after “serving her term” on Earth (?) There’re a number of scenes with (very) explicit content but those aren’t the only parts which represent the film as a whole.

Introducing… the characters:

      

      

Source: teamlanadelrey

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Daily Prompt: Bookworm (and it ended up to be a review on the book!)

Daily Prompt post: Grab the nearest book. Open it and go to the tenth word. Do a Google Image Search of the word. Write about what the image brings to mind.

This is somehow relevant since recently, I’m immersed in a really good book, titled Shanghai Girls. I came across the book in the neighborhood library about 3 weeks ago. The words in the first few pages captivate me and they didn’t sound too complex, so I was lead on to read more about it, now I absolutely love the book! It’s one of those books that tell a story behind the glam-up and once-naive personae in the plot.

There has been many little excerpts printed on the first few pages of the book and I’ve decided to choose the tenth word in the Author’s Note.

Author’s Note

Shanghai Girls takes place between 1937 and 1957. Readers will find some of what today we would call politically incorrect terms, but they are accurate to the time. I have used the Wade – Giles system of transliteration for Chinese words – whether in Mandarin, Cantonese, or in the Sze Yap and Wu dialects – again in keeping with the Era.

Regarding the exchange rates: Silver dollars were used in Shanghai before November 1935; Chinese yuan were used after 1935. The two were roughly equivalent. I have chosen to stay with dollars and cents because some were still in circulation and they are a more familiar currency to Western readers. The copper – silver exchange rate ranged from 300 to 330 coppers for every silver dollar (or yuan).

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